Available courses

This course teaches the basics of writing skills with special emphasis on creating technical documents being used in the business and academic setting.  It will train students on how to write different business letters, proposals, reports, technical descriptions/instructions, graphic aids, and other types of documents circulating inside and out of the business organization. 

This course focuses on some of the key theories that inform CMC which are broadly understood as theories of the self, theories of dyadic interaction, and theories of large-scale interaction. These theories shall be discussed in specific contexts like organizational communication, group communication, interpersonal, and intrapersonal communication. It also illustrates how these theories may apply to social media, online influence, and politics. 

Purposive Communication (for HRM)  is a three-unit course that develops students' communicative competence and enhances their cultural and intercultural awareness through multimodal tasks that provide them opportunities for communicating effectively and appropriately to a multicultural audience in a local or global context. It equips students with tools for critical evaluation of a variety of texts and focuses on the power of language and the impact of images to emphasize the importance of conveying messages responsibly. The knowledge, skills, and insights that students gain from this course may be used in their other academic endeavors, their chosen disciplines, and their future careers as they compose and produce relevant oral, written, audio-visual and/or web-based output for various purposes.

Purposive Communication (for BSIT)  is a three-unit course that develops students' communicative competence and enhances their cultural and intercultural awareness through multimodal tasks that provide them opportunities for communicating effectively and appropriately to a multicultural audience in a local or global context. It equips students with tools for critical evaluation of a variety of texts and focuses on the power of language and the impact of images to emphasize the importance of conveying messages responsibly. The knowledge, skills, and insights that students gain from this course may be used in their other academic endeavors, their chosen disciplines, and their future careers as they compose and produce relevant oral, written, audio-visual and/or web-based output for various purposes.

Purposive Communication (for BSCrim)  is a three-unit course that develops students' communicative competence and enhances their cultural and intercultural awareness through multimodal tasks that provide them opportunities for communicating effectively and appropriately to a multicultural audience in a local or global context. It equips students with tools for critical evaluation of a variety of texts and focuses on the power of language and the impact of images to emphasize the importance of conveying messages responsibly. The knowledge, skills, and insights that students gain from this course may be used in their other academic endeavors, their chosen disciplines, and their future careers as they compose and produce relevant oral, written, audio-visual and/or web-based output for various purposes.

Purposive Communication (for BSN)  is a three-unit course that develops students' communicative competence and enhances their cultural and intercultural awareness through multimodal tasks that provide them opportunities for communicating effectively and appropriately to a multicultural audience in a local or global context. It equips students with tools for critical evaluation of a variety of texts and focuses on the power of language and the impact of images to emphasize the importance of conveying messages responsibly. The knowledge, skills, and insights that students gain from this course may be used in their other academic endeavors, their chosen disciplines, and their future careers as they compose and produce relevant oral, written, audio-visual and/or web-based output for various purposes.

This course teaches the basics of writing skills with special emphasis on creating technical documents being used in the business and academic setting.  It will train students on how to write different business letters, proposals, reports, technical descriptions/instructions, graphic aids, and other types of documents circulating inside and out of the business organization. 

This is a remedial course for those students who incurred a mark of INC last semester. You need to study the topics and pass the remedial examination in order to comply with your INC requirement. 

This is a remedial course for those students who incurred a mark of INC last semester. You need to study the topics and pass the remedial examination in order to comply with your INC requirement. 

This course discusses researches focusing on important aspects of Philippine English, from both a linguistic and literary perspective. It considers some of the sociolinguistic (i.e. historical, social, political, and linguistic) aspects that have influenced the spread of the language, and the impact of historical, social, and political factors in shaping English language and literature in the Philippines.

This course surveys the 1500 years history of the English language, from its origins as a dialect to the present day as an international language. It also focuses on larger social concerns about language use, variety, and change; the relationship between spelling and pronunciation; the notion of dialect and variation across geographical and class boundaries; the arguments concerning English as an official language and the status of standard English; the role of the dictionary in describing and prescribing usage; and the ways in which words change meaning, as well as the manner in which English speakers have coined and borrowed


This course is oriented towards a pragmatics of Englishes. As a pragmatics course, it covers an array of typical pragmatic topics, varying from the more formal to the more socio-cultural.      As an English language course, our learning modules do not attempt to be a systematic description of any particular English, but rather to show how pragmatic phenomena and concepts can be related to various Englishes. Unlike most introductory pragmatics course which give the impression that the pragmatic phenomena they discuss are general, applicable to many languages and cultures, – this is a course about pragmatics and the English language.

Gender and Language is a diverse and rapidly developing field, which has both academic and popular appeal. The ‘turn to language’ across the humanities and social sciences, and the impact of critical linguistics and discourse analysis, have contributed to a reframing of questions on gender and language. This course provides a broad overview of key issues and questions, and aims to do so in both theoretical and practical ways. It introduces key theoretical concepts and frameworks and illustrates and exemplifies the relationships between gender and language use, by looking at specific texts (spoken and written), situated in specific contexts. In addition, each module/topic contains questions and suggestions for further reading, to allow those new to the field to locate the issues discussed critically and in context.


This course introduces the semantics of the English Language; it presents the basic principles of semantics, and explores how English languages organize and express meanings through words, parts of words and sentences. At the end of this course, the students shall be able to:

  • discuss the relationship of words to other words, and sentences to other sentences;
  • illustrate the importance of ‘tone of voice’ and ‘body language’ in face-to-face exchanges, and the role of context in any communication;
  • make random comparisons of features in other languages;
  • explain the knowledge speakers of a language must have in common to enable them to communicate;
  • discuss the nature of language; the structure of discourse; the distinction between lexical and grammatical meaning; and
  • examine such relations as synonymy, antonymy, and hyponymy; ambiguity; implication; factivity; aspect; and modality.

This course is intended to give you a broad overview of Applied Linguistics; It will introduce you to important areas in the field, and familiarize you with the key issues in each of those areas. In addition to helping you become familiar with the issues in Applied Linguistics, the course will also help you become familiar with some of the research methodology currently being used in the field.

This course surveys the 1500 years history of the English language, from its origins as a dialect to the present day as an international language. It also focuses on larger social concerns about language use, variety, and change; the relationship between spelling and pronunciation; the notion of dialect and variation across geographical and class boundaries; the arguments concerning English as an official language and the status of standard English; the role of the dictionary in describing and prescribing usage; and the ways in which words change meaning, as well as the manner in which English speakers have coined and borrowed